Playing for Keeps: Life and Learning on a Public School Playground (0) by Deborah Meier

Playing for Keeps: Life and Learning on a Public School Playground (0)

Book Title: Playing for Keeps: Life and Learning on a Public School Playground (0)

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN: 0807750956

Author: Deborah Meier


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Deborah Meier with Playing for Keeps: Life and Learning on a Public School Playground (0)

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''Three experienced and wise educators have written a book that reveals for us the essence of childhood. In the barren days of racing to the top, this engaging book reminds us of what education could so easily be.''
-Eleanor Duckworth, Harvard University, author of The Having of Wonderful Ideas and other Essays on Teaching and Learning, Third Edition


''Those of us who've been close to Mission Hill will rejoice to see the vision of a humane and happy school reaching a wide audience. We need this book more than ever-bursting, as it is, with the words of children and with their sense of mystery, spontaneity, and sheer jubilation. This is a great antidote to the poison of drill-and-grill austerity imposed upon our children by the technocrats of corporate accountability.''
-Jonathan Kozol, author of Letters to a Young Teacher and Shame of the Nation



Why is play important in the lives of children? What crucial aspects of learning are being neglected in the current near-elimination of recess time in public schools? Playing for Keeps, co-authored by the well-known writer and educational leader Deborah Meier, and two colleagues with equally long experience in schools, explores these questions. Based on close observations on a public school playground, the book shows children at play in a relatively natural, unstructured environment. The reader is virtually there, seeing, listening in, able to appreciate the children's curiosity, humor, intelligence, and inventiveness. Readers will recognize the children's voices and ways of thinking, and perhaps be reminded of their own childhood, their own children, or the children they teach. The authors comment on the observations, adding to the reader's own perceptions. This lively, engaging book makes a strong case for the importance of free exploration, wonder, imagination, and play to the learning and growth of children. It should contribute significantly to the understanding of all those concerned, professionally or personally, with the welfare of our school-age population.